Earwax (cerumen) is produced by glands in the ear canal. Although scientists are still not completely sure why we have earwax, its purpose is to trap dust and other small particles and prevent them from reaching, and potentially damaging or infecting the eardrum. Normally, the wax dries up and falls out of the ear, along with any trapped dust or debris. Everyone makes ear wax, but the amount and type are genetically determined just like hair color or height. Smaller or oddly shaped ear canals may make it difficult for the naturally occurring wax to get out of the canal and lead to wax impactions.

Earwax Causes

Blockage, or impaction, also occurs when the wax gets pushed deep within the ear canal. Earwax blockage affects about 6% of people and is one of the most common ear problems doctors see.

  • The most common cause of impactions is the use of Q-tips (and other objects such as bobby pins and rolled napkin corners), which can remove superficial wax but also pushes the rest of the wax deeper into the ear canal.
  • Hearing aid and earplug users are also more prone to earwax blockage.

 

Earwax Symptoms

Symptoms of an earwax impaction include:

  • Decreased hearing
  • Dizziness
  • Ear pain
  • Plugged or fullness sensation
  • Ringing in the ear
  • Itching or drainage from the ear canal

 

When to Seek Medical Care for Earwax

See your doctor if you think you may have any symptoms of an earwax impaction. Other conditions may cause these symptoms and it is important to be sure earwax is the culprit before trying any home remedies.

Go to the hospital if:

  • You have a severe spinning sensation, loss of balance, or inability to walk
  • You have persistent vomiting or high fever
  • You experience sudden loss of hearing

 

Exams and Tests

A doctor can diagnose earwax blockage (or eardrum perforation) by listening to your symptoms and then looking into your ear with an otoscope (ear-scope).

Earwax Treatment

  • Over-the-counter wax softening drops such as Debrox or Murine may be put into the affected ear and then allowed to drain out after about five minutes while holding the head to the side, allowing the drops to settle. Sitting up again will let the drops drain out by themselves.  Sometimes OTC kits can lead to further impaction.
  • A bulb-type syringe may be used to gently flush the ear with warm water. The water should be at body temperature to help prevent dizziness.  Sometimes irrigation can lead to further impaction.
  • Ear candling is not recommended. The procedure uses a hollow cone made of paraffin and beeswax with cloth on the tapered end. The tapered end is placed inside the ear, and an assistant lights the other end, while making sure your hair does not catch on fire. In theory, as the flame burns, a vacuum is created, which draws the wax out of the ear. Limited clinical trials, however, showed that no vacuum was created, and no wax was removed. Furthermore, this practice may result in serious injury.

 

Medical Treatment for Earwax Blockage

The doctor may remove your earwax with a small plastic spoon called a curette, or use suction to pull wax out of your ear canal, or prescribe prescription-strength eardrops to soften and aid in removal.

Preventing Earwax Blockages

Earwax blockage can be prevented by avoiding the use of cotton-tipped swabs or Q-tips and other objects that push the wax deeper into the ear canal.

Contact Us

Alexander City - Southern Head & Neck Surgery

3368 Highway 280 Suite G-15 Alexander City, AL 35010
(256) 329-1114

 

204 W. 1st St. Sylacauga, AL 35150
(256) 249-7044

 

206 Medical Park Talladega, AL 35160
(256) 761-1605